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Home Journal Dog Owner Guides | Spring

A Spring Groom

Regular grooming or clipping will help to keep your dog’s coat clean and free of knots and matting (read our top grooming tips here for more handy tips). This is important as matted hair can trap heat along with helping to hide any unwanted guests.

While new life is all around us during spring, sadly this also extends to some of our more unwelcome nasties. Fleas, ticks and worms all start to grow in numbers around Easter as the weather warms up so make sure your dog is protected.

Seasonal Allergies

Unfortunately, just like us, some dogs can also suffer from seasonal allergies. These allergies normally present themselves as skin issues due to allergies from pollens and grasses. Dogs with a seasonal allergies can often itch and scratch, and can damage the skin, leading to sores and infections. If you think your dog is suffering from any form of allergy take them to the vets for some advice.

Gardening

For the green fingered, spring often means beginning to plan and start your gardening. Keep in mind that some dogs really enjoy digging as much as we do so avoid planting toxic bulbs. Although the bright yellow flowers of daffodil blooming are often the first signs of spring, daffodil bulbs, along with tulip, hyacinth, amaryllis and narcissus bulbs, can cause nasty reactions if eaten by dogs, and can even be fatal in some cases. The rest of the daffodil (stem, leaves and flower) are less toxic, but still not good for dogs so make sure any flowers are kept out of reach.

Spring Cleaning

With Spring comes the ‘big spring clean’ and while keeping a clean house is important for pet care, some cleaning products can be dangerous for dogs. Check that products such as floor and surface cleaners are safe for pets. One of our favourite brands to use is Wilton London who’s products not only smell amazing, they're also eco-friendly and Vegan Society registered.

Easter Care for Dogs

Spring is always joined by Easter which means raisin filled hot-cross buns and chocolate eggs, both of which can be fatal for dogs.
Chocolate contains theobromine which is life-threatening for dogs and the higher the coco content the higher the content of theobromine. The effects of chocolate poisoning in dogs usually appear 4 to 24 hours after they’ve eaten it but try to get your dog to the vet as soon as you notice they have eaten any so the right treatment can be given.

The first signs of chocolate poisoning include:
• excessive thirst
• vomiting
• a tender tummy
• drooling
• restlessness.

Top Main Image by photographer William Wegman

Dog Owner Guides | Spring